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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dspace.ucuenca.edu.ec/handle/123456789/34475
Title: Unravelling evapotranspiration controls and components in tropical Andean tussock grasslands
Other Titles: 
Authors: Ochoa Sanchez, Ana Elizabeth
Crespo Sanchez, Patricio Javier
Carrillo Rojas, Galo Jose
Marin Molina, Franklin Geovanny
Celleri Alvear, Rolando Enrique
metadata.dc.ucuenca.correspondencia: Ochoa Sanchez, Ana Elizabeth, ochoa.anaelizabeth@gmail.com
Keywords: Andes
Mountain
Net radiation
Páramo
Transpiration
Tropics
metadata.dc.ucuenca.areaconocimientofrascatiamplio: 1. Ciencias Naturales y Exactas
metadata.dc.ucuenca.areaconocimientofrascatidetallado: 1.5.8 Ciencias del Medioambiente
metadata.dc.ucuenca.areaconocimientofrascatiespecifico: 1.5 Ciencias de la Tierra y el Ambiente
metadata.dc.ucuenca.areaconocimientounescoamplio: 05 - Ciencias Físicas, Ciencias Naturales, Matemáticas y Estadísticas
metadata.dc.ucuenca.areaconocimientounescodetallado: 0521 - Ciencias Ambientales
metadata.dc.ucuenca.areaconocimientounescoespecifico: 052 - Medio Ambiente
Issue Date: 2020
metadata.dc.ucuenca.embargoend: 10-Jun-2050
metadata.dc.ucuenca.volumen: Volumen 34, Número 9
metadata.dc.source: Hydrological Processes
metadata.dc.identifier.doi: https://doi.org/10.1002/hyp.13716
metadata.dc.type: ARTÍCULO
Abstract: 
The study of the environmental factors that control evapotranspiration and the components of evapotranspiration leads to a better understanding of the actual evapotranspiration (ET) process that links the functioning of the soil, water and atmosphere. It also improves local, regional and global ET modelling. Globally, few studies so far focussed on the controls and components of ET in alpine grasslands, especially in mountainous sites such as the tussock grasslands located in the páramo biome (above 3300 m a.s.l.). The páramo occupies 35 000 km2 and provides water resources for many cities in the Andes. In this article, we unveiled the controls on ET and provided the first insights on the contribution of transpiration to ET. We found that the wet páramo is an energy-limited region and net radiation (Rn) is primarily controlling ET. ET was on average 1.7 mm/day. The monthly average evaporative fraction (ET/Rn) was 0.47 and it remained similar for wet and dry periods. The secondary controls on ET were wind speed, aerodynamic resistance and surface resistance that appeared more important for dry periods, where significantly higher ET rates were found (20% increase). During dry events, transpiration was on average 1.5 mm/day (range 0.7–2.7 mm/day), similar to other tussock grasslands in New Zealand (range 0.6–3.3 mm/day). Evidence showed interception contributes more to ET than transpiration. This study sets a precedent towards a better understanding of the evapotranspiration process and will ultimately lead to a better land-atmosphere fluxes modelling in the tropics. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Description: 
The study of the environmental factors that control evapotranspiration and the components of evapotranspiration leads to a better understanding of the actual evapotranspiration (ET) process that links the functioning of the soil, water and atmosphere. It also improves local, regional and global ET modelling. Globally, few studies so far focussed on the controls and components of ET in alpine grasslands, especially in mountainous sites such as the tussock grasslands located in the páramo biome (above 3300 m a.s.l.). The páramo occupies 35 000 km2 and provides water resources for many cities in the Andes. In this article, we unveiled the controls on ET and provided the first insights on the contribution of transpiration to ET. We found that the wet páramo is an energy-limited region and net radiation (Rn) is primarily controlling ET. ET was on average 1.7 mm/day. The monthly average evaporative fraction (ET/Rn) was 0.47 and it remained similar for wet and dry periods. The secondary controls on ET were wind speed, aerodynamic resistance and surface resistance that appeared more important for dry periods, where significantly higher ET rates were found (20% increase). During dry events, transpiration was on average 1.5 mm/day (range 0.7–2.7 mm/day), similar to other tussock grasslands in New Zealand (range 0.6–3.3 mm/day). Evidence showed interception contributes more to ET than transpiration. This study sets a precedent towards a better understanding of the evapotranspiration process and will ultimately lead to a better land-atmosphere fluxes modelling in the tropics. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
URI: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/hyp.13716
metadata.dc.ucuenca.urifuente: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10991085
ISSN: 0885-6087
Appears in Collections:Artículos

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